1. Overview of Unit 1

Essential Question(s):
  1. How do interacting cultures create changes in society?
  2. How do the various levels of technological development affect different cultures?

Learning Target(s):

  1. Define and use the term global convergence.
  2. Identify three (3) ways in which the events that occurred in Unit 1 led to global convergence.
  3. Record evidence of how global convergence affected population, environment, ideas, inventions, trade, manufacturing, states, and empires.
  4. Generate relative questions that would lead into a further study of global convergence.

Directions:

Activity #1:
  1. Copy and complete the diagram below.
  2. In the circle, place the words "global convergence."
  3. Independently, fill in the boxes that surround the circle. Be prepared to share your ideas with the class.
 
 
Activity #2:
  1. In their notebooks, students will take notes individually using the graphic organizer below during the lecture.

 Areas of Impact by Global Convergence from 1400-1800

Evidence of Impact of the Global Convergence 

 Questions You Have About the Impact of Global Convergence

Population & Environment    
Ideas & Inventions    
Trade & Manufacturing    
States & Empires    

    2. At the end of the lecture, students will generate questions related to the unit.

    3. Students will then share their notes and questions with their groups in order to present evidence and a question to the class.

    4. Individually, students will answer reflection questions in their notebooks.
    5. The answers will be shared with the groups and then discussed as a class.
 
Reflection Questions:
  1. What events that happened in Unit 1 allowed global convergence to occur? Give three events and explain how you decided on those three events.
  2. Define "global convergence." Give three examples from the unit overview that illustrates the concept, "global convergence."
  3. Why did Europe have "some catching up to do" in the areas of art, science, and philosophy?
  4. How did global convergence accelerate the pace at which change occurred? What were the positive consequences of those changes? What were the negative consequences of those changes?
  5. What would drive people to leave their own homes? What were the positive consequences of the movement of people? What were the negative consequences of that movement?
Homework:
 
  • Go to the World History Journal - Look under - Unit 2 - Medieval v. Renaissance Art.
 
Assessment:
 
Chart:
  • 2 points per chart blank @ 8 blanks = 16 points available
    • Points are determined by evidence of thoughts and details.
Reflection Questions:
  • 5 points per reflection question @ 4 questions = 20 points available
    • Points are determined by accuracy and evidence of thought and details. If no examples are given, the maximum number of points available per question is 4.
Homework Questions:
  • 5 points per reflection question @ 6 questions = 30 points available
    • Points are determined by accuracy and evidence of thought. If no supporting evidence is given, the maximum number of points available per question is 4
  • 3 points per comment/response @ 2 responses = 6 points available
  • Points are determined by accuracy and evidence of thought
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